Three Simple LinkedIn Updates that Will make you a Standout

There are a few easy tasks every LinkedIn user can do to easily improve the impact of their LinkedIn profile. Here are several to consider.

The cover image behind your profile picture starts with the default standard turquoise blue background with the lines running through it. You can make a greater impact by selecting a custom image that is 1584 x 394 pixels. (If you are not adept at this, any graphic artist can convert an image for you.) For example, you can take your company logo or an interesting horizontal image from your website and insert that easily into the cover image slot. This immediately makes you stand out from the literally millions of LinkedIn users who stay with the staid turquoise cover image. The down side of staying with this default image is it tends to say, “I don’t use LinkedIn very much.”

Another easy thing to accomplish is to update your Headline statement. Many users type in their firm name in their headline when LinkedIn has already automatically inserted your company name on the right side of your Profile page just under your cover image. Why not take this opportunity to customize your Headline turning it into something that articulates exactly what you do. For example rather than repeat your firm name there, write something more compelling in this space such as, “Trial Attorney Specializing in Business Litigation and Attorney Malpractice.”

Our final tip: review your Profile Summary. You can find it just under your cover image. In your Summary, do you repeatedly say, “I do this, and I do that?” Do you have long paragraphs that seem to go on and on? Or do you take the time to create a more branded approach and describe what you do and how you solve problems for people? We always recommend keeping the copy to two short paragraphs and then perhaps listing specific skills or services that you offer. Keep this simple format so readers can quickly ascertain who you are, what you do and how you do it. Keep some of those details about your firm or company for the “Experience” portion below the Profile Summary.

These few updates can assist those who view your Profile page to get a clearer understanding of what you do. After all, according to research from Forbes, over 60% of individuals will check you out on LinkedIn before they will go to your company website. Don’t you check out contacts or potential contacts on LinkedIn this way?

Branding is the Strategic Backbone of Law Firm Marketing

Law firms are increasingly gaining a deeper and more refined understanding that strong branded efforts can have on a firm’s bottom line. Branding uncovers that unique position and differentiation from other firms in the same space. Corporate America has been successfully utilizing branding forever. When the awareness of branding first began to get the attention of law firms, most were skeptical – it was something new and quite different. Many doubted it was more than just smoke and mirrors. These days, law firms and other professional service providers are gaining client share by developing strong brands and then consistently using their unique messaging throughout their websites, blogs, client pitches, content marketing, events and advertising. This article on JD Supra provides a detailed look at how to use branding as your firm’s strategic asset in developing marketing and business development plans that yield results.

https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/branding-is-the-strategic-backbone-of-84058/

 

The Crown Jewel of Content Marketing: Storytelling

The legal profession has come a long way, baby. Social media marketing has taken a firm hold in the legal profession. At this point only the laggards remain uninvolved in any social media. And to think the ABA Technology Committee published this quote back in 2016, “Taking control of your online presence is a necessity, and there are few better ways to do so than social media. Used carefully, social media can give your firm a voice, amplify your professional reputation, and help drive new business.

Content marketing is king but the crown jewel of content marketing is allowing your knowledge to shine through storytelling. I mean who doesn’t want to hear a great story? By combining fresh content in your area of expertise or brand with stories about your industry, clients, organizations and experiences, attorneys can provide interesting and compelling reading to clearly and meaningfully demonstrate their knowledge and brand distinction.

Take the boutique law firm of Tredway Lumsdaine & Doyle (TLD Law). They qualified this year to become a member of the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms (NAMWOLF). Less than 2% of all law firms qualify. The firm recognizes the enormous opportunity it possesses to let its branded culture of diversity and inclusion shine. To TLD, it is more than just having diverse bodies in the firm, it’s also the ability to incorporate a variety of opinions, ideas and concepts when solving challenging legal issues that make this claim come alive. Fortune 500 companies seek out NAMWOLF members to help fulfil their need and/or requirement to hire minority and diverse attorneys. Storytelling, as a part of a well-defined content marketing strategy, can increase the ability for TLD Law to earn more client and potential client engagement.

The firm has embraced storytelling and branded messaging as part of its content marketing to consistently expand its presence in the marketplace with clients and potential clients.

What area(s) do you wish to promote and be known for? Once an attorney or law firm fleshes this out, it’s only a matter of time using consistent storytelling and content marketing to increase your practice’s footprint and business development success.

 

 

Finding True North: How Corporate Legal Departments are Leading the Legal Industry Forward

For over 25 years internationally renowned legal futurist Richard Susskind has been researching and opining on alternative ways law firms might work best with their clients. In his book Tomorrow’s Lawyers Susskind writes, “Law firms in the coming decades will be driven relentlessly by their clients to reduce costs.” All of his books, lectures and keynote addresses have intimated for decades that law firms must change from the traditional billable hour and become more focused on service delivery based on client preferences, creating better efficiencies, using more technologies and offering predictability.

During the last several decades many feel law firms were and are calling the shots. They primarily bill by the hour, grudgingly discuss alternative ways of delivering their services and raise their hourly rates almost annually. From the legal department’s vantage point an hourly fee-based model does not encourage true partnering, rather it tends to focus on profitability for law firms. Creating true alternative fee arrangements generally turns out to be disappointing for in-house counsels as typically nothing more gets offered than perhaps a 15% discount on the hourly billing rate. In-house counsels have been frustrated not being able to change processes and service delivery options. They want predictability and efficiencies not championed by the billable hour.

Out of their frustration, about five years ago, a group of in-house counsels from larger corporations started to meet informally. They expressed their specific frustrations with how their departments were run and also surfaced issues surrounding the way legal services were being delivered from law firms. Up to this point legal departments owned a fair share of blame for the dysfunction and inefficiencies in the system as they didn’t know what to do to change things, they just wanted to create an easier and more productive way to work. These soon-to-be change agents started to share information, processes, and technologies such as e-billing, e-discovery and knowledge management to create better efficiencies. In addition they discussed how they might work with outside law firms more proactively and in a way to minimize costs, frustrations and repetitive tasks. They wished law firms would approach them to ask what would make the delivery of services better for the client. These visionary leaders became the founders of the Corporate Legal Operations Consortium (CLOC) and included Connie Brenton from NetApp, and includes Mary O’Carroll from Google, Jeff Franke from Yahoo, Christine Coats from Oracle, Lisa Konie from Adobe, Steve Harmon from Cisco, and Brian Hupp from Facebook.

In 2016, CLOC incorporated as a nonprofit trade association and it has become one of the fastest growing nonprofit legal organizations in the world. Since incorporating, CLOC has grown to include over 1200 members, 600 member companies, 26% of the Fortune 500, and spanning 40 states and 36 countries.

“Everybody keeps saying the legal services industry is broken, that radical change is badly needed, but only a few, like industry thought leader Richard Susskind, were even looking at the issues industry wide. No one had tried to set forth what true north is for this industry.  Most legal departments focused on law firms as the only ones really needing to change.” said Jeff Franke, Assistant General Counsel of Global Legal Operations at Yahoo and founding member of the Corporate Legal Operations Consortium (CLOC).

But the challenges the corporate legal services industry face go way beyond the billable hour; beyond the intransigence of law firms to change their basic operating model.  Said Jeff Franke, “We need lots of change with respect to the six core ecosystem players.”

  • corporations
  • law firms
  • regulators
  • law schools
  • tech providers
  • outside service providers

Corporations have started making changes and we will see more radical change over the next three to five years than we have seen in the last twenty years.

The industry has come a come a long way from the days when GC’s were seen primarily as risk managers who relied almost exclusively on outside counsel to support a corporation’s legal needs.  Today, forty to sixty percent of all corporate legal work is done in-house.  As GC’s have brought legal support in-house to meet the mandate to deliver strategic, efficient legal support, operations excellence has become a critical necessity.  Unfortunately, historically the only way to develop that excellence was from the ground up: legal operations did not exist as a discipline.  No one offered a “how to guide” on this complex topic.

With the mandate to “Run legal like a business,” thoughtful in-house operations professionals got to work defining the space.  It was initially a slow evolution of legal ops. CLOC, through its members and leadership, quickly created a thoughtful, effective base of knowledge, templates, benchmarking capability, and best practices anywhere to help solve the frustrations they were feeling.  Their efforts led to the creation of CLOC’s 12 Core Competencies, a reference model for legal operations excellence.

CLOC’s Core Competencies chart goes here.

Among the many resources CLOC offers members, and the industry as a whole, its annual Institute offers a deep sharing of resources, templates, training ideas and implementation strategies. The CLOC conferences, 12 Core Competencies, templates, articles, and materials, are helping  legal departments and other core ecosystem players better understand what corporate legal departments need and want.

The Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) has jumped into legal operations in a big way as well. Amar Sarwal, Chief Legal Officer and Senior VP of Advocacy and Legal Services, spearheads the ACC Legal Operations program and has aligned it fully with the ACC Value Challenge.

In addition to supporting and advancing the legal operations profession, ACC views its role as assisting the general counsel’s office to fully leverage legal operations. According to Amar, “Our role will not only make the legal operations function more coherent, but also help unify the process for its stakeholders. We help many legal departments that have previously not had a legal ops function open up to the possibilities. Wherever a department finds itself in this process, we can share concepts, leadership strategies, conferences, tools, and written guidelines to enhance the legal ops function. Both the ACC program and CLOC are committed to the success of the legal department.”

ACC legal ops focuses in two areas. It offers assistance to onboard new legal ops professionals sharing and leveraging materials and knowledge with a foundational toolkit. ACC also helps advance those legal operations counsels already immersed by providing continued assistance, strategies and information to get them to the next level.

What Your Department Can Do

As lead operations counsel for Yahoo, Jeff Franke added, “Many in-house legal operation counsels feel a legal department might begin by defining the largest areas of frustration working with outside law firms, vendors and legal project management. Ask your law firms to step up. Invite them to visit and share ideas how you might work together to create better communications and stronger relationships. Legal ops in-house counsels anticipate more and more law firms will get the message and proactively come to them to find ways to create mutually beneficial strategies.

“As an example, we spend money just to pull stats for our quarterly reviews. It would be wonderful if law firms proactively did this for us. Come to a quarterly review with statistics. Law firms need to understand that as legal departments are tasked with running a business within our company’s business, we need law firms on board too.”

Those working in-house looking to deepen their involvement might explore CLOC’s 12 Core Competencies selecting just a few to start the analysis process. What technologies do you already have and which ones are most important? Which will relieve your biggest frustrations and headaches with outside firms? Do you have a legal operations team in-house devoted to creating better efficiencies and partnering with outside firms? How might you start this process?

Pratik Patel, VP of Innovation and Products at Elevate Services, says without a legal operations function, the result is often overworked teams and inefficient practice of law.  “Legal operations can tame the chaos of running the legal department,” says Patel, who provides consulting services and technology implementation to in-house legal departments. “Without the legal ops function, lawyers are forced to design and develop the business aspects of their function in self-service models or in silos, often leading to limited or non-existent processes and fairly pedestrian use of technology.”

Pratik explains that developing a framework around legal operations and prioritizing the competency areas can build efficiencies that better align with a company’s business objectives.

He recommends four simple steps to get started:

  1. Identify the law department’s business objectives.
  2. Gauge each core competency’s ability to influence those objectives.
  3. Assess the overall levels of maturity in each area.
  4. Focus on the maturity areas most likely to “move the needle” towards your objectives.

Conclusion

Today, the legal operations function at major corporations has migrated from an uncoordinated disparate set of actions by individual players to a more carefully defined, cross-disciplinary profession loosely aligned across hundreds of companies and government entities.  The focus is on changing not only the way corporate legal departments deliver legal services but on the way the whole corporate legal services industry should function. Corporate legal departments are in the driver’s seat.

The first CLOC conference in 2016 drew 500 registrants. In 2017 there were 1,000 attendees and CLOC leaders are predicting that the upcoming April 22 to 25 Institute in Las Vegas will secure more than 2,500 attendees. https://cloc.org/conference

There is no doubt that legal operations is a growing force in the competitive landscape for law firms to keep and expand client relationships. CLOC leadership predicts 2018 will be a watershed year in which we see many more legal departments jump into legal operations and for those already involved, the prediction is the level of use of legal operations will significantly deepen. Legal operations is a partnership between legal departments and their outside law firms. If the steady and impressive growth of CLOC membership and legal operations professionals who take advantage of the numerous legal ops offerings from ACC continues, it will not be too many years in the future when law firms who resisted learning about legal operations will wish they hadn’t.

Written for the March 30th Publication in Today’s General Counsel

 

Is 2018 the Year that Law Firms Close the Gap on Legal Operations?

The practice of law is changing – of this there is no doubt. But if the energy and forward movement keeps up at the current pace, it seems that 2018 may be the tipping point for law firms to start to become more than just aware of legal operations.

Five years ago a group of visionary in-house counsels from large corporations starting meeting and sharing information informally with the goal of creating more effective and productive relationships with their outside law firms.

In 2016, these founding members, Mary O’Carroll from Google, Connie Brenton from Net App, Jeff Franke from Yahoo, Christine Coats from Oracle, Lisa Konie from Adobe, Steve Harmon from Cisco, and Brian Hupp from Facebook formed the Corporate Legal Operations Consortium, CLOC, and planned their first CLOC Institute that very year. Over 500 legal ops professionals and legal services providers attended this first conference. The movement took off. At the 2017 conference there were over 1,000 attendees. The 2018 conference organizers predict over 2,500 attendees will flock to this year’s conference from April 22 – 25 in Las Vegas. www.cloc.org

“The CLOC Institute is the largest gathering of corporate legal professionals in the world focused on optimizing the delivery of legal services to businesses. The energized, inclusive and open community we’ve created welcomes industry veterans and newcomers, allowing attendees to create a breadth and depth of connections not available anywhere else. With more than 75 curated educational sessions, provided by industry leaders, the CLOC Institute offers unrivaled opportunities to learn, share, and connect”, according to the institute’s conference proceedings.

And according to an article by Jennifer Brown published in Canadian Lawyer, it is, “Not Yet the Tipping Point.” Full article here

In the article, Ms. Brown reported that Mary O’Carroll, while speaking on a panel during LegalWeek in New York in January, discussed the fact that her role is an emerging one.

Legal operations used to be one that existed only in large departments focused on efficiencies and effectiveness. It’s now often the first hire after the general counsel in a new legal department. ‘The value and impact of this role is being recognized and the voice of the client has really started to come together and demanding we change the legal industry,’ Ms. O’Carroll said.

“Now, when the legal department at Google has a piece of work that needs to go external, a series of questions are asked: Does it need to go to a law firm? Can it go to an alternative services provider? Can it be done in-house? Can it be automated? Can technology satisfy the problem?”

The upcoming CLOC Institute is not only for legal department members, both in-house counsels and legal operations professionals, but also law firm attorneys, other legal service providers and consultants that assist law firms and/or legal departments to create and implement successful legal ops programs. Legal ops is about creating better efficiencies, predictability in fees, and increased transparency between outside law firms and legal departments. With an open and sharing mentality enveloping the conference, the networking opportunities will be front and center.

The educational offerings are deep and wide for law firms. They include an inside look for those starting up a legal ops function – for either a legal department or a law firm wishing to grow their practice through client focused legal operation preferences. A few additional topics in the myriad of offerings include knowledge management, connecting legal ops technologies for better ROI, strategies to more effectively partner with outside counsel, and additional concepts for pricing, profitability and legal project management.

Conference organizers are hoping more law firms will attend sending their client relationship partners, those attorneys responsible for firm management, and IT and marketing professionals who can coordinate the process, the training and implementation. There is no better conference on this topic anywhere.

Directors of Legal Operations are the folks who hire and fire outside law firms. And more and more corporate legal departments are making a deeper commitment to expand their company’s legal operations’ programs.

This is the right time and this conference is the right place for law firms wishing to stay relevant and grow their firms. Learn how to transform your firm’s culture in order to adapt to this major shift in how law firms will deliver services in the future – and that future is now.

 

The Sky’s the Limit!

The sky may be the limit now for small and mid-size firms to successfully target, court and convert larger company clients. In fact during a recent interview with the Director of Legal Operations at a Fortune 500 insurance corporation, I was told, “We like working with mid and smaller size firms because they tend to give better service and are more open to forming ‘sticky’ relationships with us. They seem more interested in understanding our pain points. Frankly, we find it easier to form strong relationships with them. Mid-size and small firms are starting to capture a big slice of the work these days.”

According to this article published by General Counsel News, “Companies want Smaller Firms But are Having Trouble Finding Them.”

Full Article Here

Is Lawyer’s Trusted Advisor Status in Jeopardy?

The Problem

According to James Bliwas, Senior Marketing and Communications Strategist, “This news ought to be deeply disturbing to managing partners and lawyers regardless of the size of their firm: Attorneys are losing their once-reverent position as businesses most-trusted advisor.” Continue reading Is Lawyer’s Trusted Advisor Status in Jeopardy?